Five in Seven

March 28, 2021

It was Mr.Toad’s wild ride for sure with spectacular sights and trails to explore.   Though I must confess when we started down the ‘trail’ at Bryce with the canyon of hoodoos I thought Len was being caring and watching out for me when in reality I think he was holding on for dear life.  Not a trail for those afraid of heights.  It was probably quite amusing for the true hikers!  We both opted to go the easier route which still gave the views)  At the end of seven days i was very aware of what my body can and can’t do now.  The trip was a sensory overload of stunning rock formations and to celebrate Catherine’s last year in the 20’s!  

RED ROCK CANYON: This park features scenic desert cliffs, buttes and spectacular rock formations. The park is located where the southernmost tip of the Sierra Nevada converge with the El Paso Range. Each tributary canyon is unique, with dramatic shapes and vivid colors. Close to Vegas with lots of hiking trails!  Didn’t see that herd of wild burros but did see the evidence.

 

ZION: Situated in the southwestern corner of Utah near the Nevada and Arizona borders,is Zion National Park. The highlight of Zion National Park is an expansive canyon. Rock formations are visible from the road.  The more interesting parts of the park can only be accessed by Shuttle. But beware of 5:00pm when everyone is trying to make it back to their cars.  It’s a long wait in between buses.  

BRYCE CANYON: In Southwestern Utah is famous for the largest collection of hoodoos—the distinctive rock formations at Bryce—in the world. With snow still on the ground the pinto effect of the hoodoos and canyons was spectacular!

 

On the way back into Vegas was VALLEY OF FIRE: A small but beautiful park very close to Las Vegas known for it’s “Firewave”, a spectacular geological formation between the rocks.  Here we were graced with the sight of a herd of BigHorn mountain sheep. 

 

Valley of FireValley of Fire Red Canyon Bighorn SheepRed Canyon Bighorn SheepForaging in the canyon

DEATH VALLEY: In this below-sea-level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes with a virtual mix mash of shapes, textures and dashes of color.  Having visited the park before my focus was on capturing the shapes and shadows!  You could spend days doing that and unfortunately we only had one.  We did manage a sunset and sunrise at Mesquite Dunes and were caught up in a small wind storm of sand.  This was the only place I really had time to bring out the tripod and I’m glad I did for the winds were so fierce I needed something to steady myself.  Next on our list are the Arches!  Thank you again to Len, my  trusty chauffeur and navigator!

 

Death Valley Sand PatternsDeath Valley Sand Patterns

 

 


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